Year: 2018, Issue: June

1

Diversity of Cosmarium from Sukhana dam, Aurangabad (M.S.).

Sampada K. Shejul and R. J. Sawant

Pages:

01-05

2018

June

Algal diversity, Cosmarium, Chlorophyceae, Sukhana dam.

Sukhana dam is constructed on Sukhana river in Aurangabad district of Maharashtra State. On the banks of the dam, the water is shallow having good number of plants and aquatic animals. During winter, migratory birds are observed in this area. The algae and other aquatic plants might be serving as food for these birds and the aquatic animals. Therefore, the study of algae of this water body was undertaken during the years2015-2017. Several species of algae belonging to Chlorophyceae, Bacillariophyceae, Cyanophyceae and Euglenophyceae were observed. Among Chlorophyceae, species of Cosmarium were observed at the different locations of the water body. In this paper, 26 species of Cosmarium observed are described.

2

Comparative phytochemical analysis of the aqueous leaf extract of some important leafy vegetables from Durg (Chhattisgarh).

Deepti Chauhan, A. K. Shrivastava and Suneeta Patra

Pages:

07-10

2018

June

Phytochemical screening, Leafy vegetables, Aqueous solvent, Nutrients.

Leafy vegetables play an essential role in human diets, as they support the normal functioning of the different body systems. They provide our cells with vitamins, minerals, fiber, essential oils and phytochemicals. The non-nutritive chemical compounds produced by plants, called phytochemicals, have protective or disease preventive properties against competitors, predators, or pathogens. It is well-known that plants produce these chemicals to protect themselves and recent research demonstrate that they can also protect humans against diseases. There are more than thousand known phytochemicals found in plants. Some of these have been used as traditional medicines. The present paper aims at the comparative phytochemical analysis of the leaf extract in aqueous solvent of commonly grown five types of leafy vegetables that are of common occurrence in the town, Durg, viz., Cordia dichotoma G. Frost, Senna tora (L.) Roxb., Ipomea aquatica Forssk, Lablab purpureus (L.) Sweet and Corchorus olitorius L.

3

Studies on fresh water Bacillariophycean diversity of Gajner lake, Bikaner, Rajasthan (India).

Rohitash, M. C. Mali and Gajanand Modi

Pages:

11-16

2018

June

Diversity, Bacillariophyceae, Diatom, Gajner lake, Phytoplanktons.

Bacillariophycean algae are unicellular or colonial forms in freshwater plankton and also lived as epiphyte on other algae and higher plants in Gajner lake. They form a large proportion of bottom flora of lake. We were collected algal samples twice a month from January,2017-December,2017. Our study deals with periodicity and taxonomy of newely reported Bacillariophycean taxa of Gajner lake, which is a fresh water body of Bikaner district. In our present investigation floristic composition, periodicity and seasonal variations were observed throughout the year. There are 25 species of 13 genera of Bacillariophycean taxa were reported. These diatoms showed remarkable seasonal variations in numbers, species and density.

4

Impact of environmental lead on plants present on the road sides of NH-157 at Kalinga ghat section, Kandhamal district, Odisha.

Sabita Barik and Alaka Sahu

Pages:

17-22

2018

June

Impact of residual lead, Plants, Pigments, National highway, Automobile exhaust.

Significant amount of residual lead was present in the leaves of old plants collected from both the sides of NH-157 at Kalinga ghat area. Higher accumulation of lead in perennial old plant leaves was observed. Young plants either showed no residual lead or the amount of lead if present was insignificant. No residual lead was observed in small herbs present on both the sides of the road. In other areas adjacent to the ghat area, no significant residual lead was noted. Significant decrease in total chlorophyll content was recorded in plant leaves situated on the roadsides of the ghat area when compared to plants collected from deep inside the forest area far away from freeways/highways. Significant decrease in total phaeophytin content was recorded in plant leaves situated on the roadsides of the ghat area when compared to plants collected from deep inside the forest area far away from freeways/highways like chlorophylls. Both the pigments followed the same trend. However, insignificant decrease or no change in carotenoid content was recorded in plant leaves collected from the plants available on the roadsides of the ghat area when compared to plants collected from deep inside the forest area far away from freeways/highways. The changes in the pigment content may not be due to lead only and the changes were probably due to the synergistic effect of lead along with other pollutants coming out as exhaust. The impact on pigment content was due to lead availability along with other gaseous exhaust coming out from small and heavy vehicles in air from automobiles exhausts and surface absorption of lead by plants from polluted air.

5

Ethno-medicinal plants in Bankura district with special reference to skin diseases.

Arijit Sinhababu and Arpita Banerjee

Pages:

23-26

2018

June

Bankura. Ethno-medicinal plants, Skin diseases, Tribals.

All socio-cultural, economic and other activities of mankind are directly or indirectly associated with various environmental resources. The use of plants as medicines predates written in human history. Human skin, the external covering of the body, is the biggest organ in the body. Skin health is fundamental to total health. Plants can possibly cure various types of skin diseases. The paper aims to identify, collect and documentation of the existing folk knowledge related to the utilization of medicinal flora for healing of skin ailments among the local inhabitants of Bankura district, West Bengal, India. The present paper deals with 38 medicinal plants belonging to 18 families that are reported along with their therapeutic uses against skin diseases.

6

Analysis of water quality and diversity of Chlorophyceae in upper lake, Bhopal.

Mahima Dixit and A. Alia

Pages:

27-30

2018

June

Chlorophyceae, Diversity, Physico-chemical parameters, Pollution.

The present paper deals with the study of Chlorophyceae and analysis of water quality in Upper lake, Bhopal. Samples were collected from two sampling stations for a period of one year on monthly intervals from the lake. Physico-chemical parameters: temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, alkalinity, water transparency and nutrients were measured simultaneously. Present investigation shows that the status of the Upper lake is eutrophic in nature. The physico-chemical parameters played an important role in distribution and diversity of algae. Higher peak of Chlorophycean algae were reported during summer. In Upper lake during the study period 60 genera of Chlorophyceae were identified. The Scendesmus was found the dominant species of this group. Second dominant species was Ankistrodesmus. The presence of Scenedesmus species indicated the organic pollution of lake water.

7

Growth performance of tree species after sixteen years of plantations in monoculture and mixed culture on coal mine spoil.

Brajesh Kumar Singh and A. K. Jha

Pages:

31-36

2018

June

Growth performance, Tree species, Mono culture, Mixed culture, Coalmine spoil.

The tree growth performance study was conducted on coal mine spoil at Bina Project Singrauli in 2009. Data on height and diameter growth for tree species planted in monoculture and mixed culture experimental plots were recorded. Height/diameter ratio, tree volume, annual increment in height, diameter and tree volume were calculated for each species in monoculture and mixed culture. In monoculture leguminous tree species L.leucocephala and D.sissoo showed better performance in terms of height growth. In general the height, diameter and tree volume growth was better among non-legumes in T.arjuna and E.officinalis, but among legumes better performance were shown by D.sissoo, A.procera and P.pinnata in mixed culture experimental plots.

8

Isolation of phenol degrading bacteria from industrial waste.

Sunita Arya, B. R. Siddharth, Sunit Kumar Saxena and Gyaneshwar Patel

Pages:

37-46

2018

June

Clerodendrum phlomides, New record, Taxonomy, Urban flora.

Four shrub species of Clerodendrum L. (C.cordatum, C.indicum, C.inerme and C.phlomides) occurring in city areas of Varanasi district, Uttar Pradesh have been described taxonomically in detail. C.phlomides is found as a new record for the state of Uttar Pradesh. A differentiation table along with photographs and analytical drawings of each species is provided.

9

Shrubs of Varanasi city Clerodendrum L. (Verbenaceae) with a new record to Uttar Pradesh.

Ajai Kumar Singh, S. N. Dubey and R. K. Sahu

Pages:

47-50

2018

June

Isolation, Phenol degrading bacteria, Industrial waste.

Phenol is one of the most common pollutants present in the industrial waste. It create many health problem in human as well as in many other animals. In present study three different samples were collected from the Dada Nagar industrial area Kanpur, from these sample we have isolated 15 different bacteria. These bacteria were subjected for the phenol tolerance test. From these bacteria we were isolated four bacteria (DI-2, DI-3, SWD-2, DFS-2) who have good level of phenol tolerance. All four bacteria were subjected for comparative phenol degradation study. We found that all four bacteria have the capacity to degrade phenol but the most efficient bacteria for phenol degrading was DFS-2. These four bacteria were identified as DI-2 (Pseudomonas aeruginosa), DI-3 (Pseudomonas citronellolis), SWD-2 (Klebsiella spp.,), SDF-2 (Pseudomonas putida).

10

Documentation of some plants of Asteraceae used as herbal healer in Bankura district, West Bengal.

Arpita Banerjee and Arijit Sinhababu

Pages:

51-54

2018

June

Asteraceae, Bankura tribals, Traditional medicine.

India with its great topographic and climatic diversity has a very rich and diverse flora and fauna. Indian herbalists such as Maharshi Charaka and Sushruta worked in search of different herbal plant parts for different ailments of human body. Although there has been a rapid extension uses of allopathic medicinal treatment in India is common in rural areas but still now a days the use of different plant products is very common as the source of medicines among various tribal people particularly in the remote areas of West Bengal with few health facilities. Flora of Bankura district is one of the potential source of different traditional medicinal plants. Plant diversity of Bankura district is a boon to tribal people and it should be emphasized as the flora of this area should be conserved for the future generations and the tribal people should be encouraged for growing these medicinally important plants on a large scale for optimizing their economic conditions. Present paper documented with 26 ethno-medicinal plants of Bankura district, West Bengal, belonged to the family Asteraceae which are used for different diseases such as inflammation, cough and cold, different skin diseases, ulcers, leucoderma and leprosy. The present finding supports with further investigation on chemical and pharmacological actions to validate the claims.

11

Marketable surplus and post harvest losses of wheat crop in Jabalpur district of M.P.

P. R. Pandey, A. N. Gautam and S. K. Rajak

Pages:

55-57

2018

June

Marketable Surplus, Post harvest losses of wheat.

Market surplus of wheat crop is depends upon the volume of production, which ultimately increases with the increases in farm size. Since family requirement, irrespective of farm size usually remains the same, large farm owners had more surpluses to offer for sale in the market in comparison to others. Higher marketable surplus of wheat crop in the farms can be achieved by raising productivity level of wheat. It is well known fact that productivity level is higher on the farms operating with higher technology and mechanization which generally is true for large farm. The total marketable surplus was estimated 77.43%, but in the case of small farms, the percentage of marketable surplus was 46.22%. The marketable surplus increased as the size of farms increases it was estimated at 62.21% in medium farms and 86.76% in large farms. Overall wastage of wheat production at different levels harvest and post harvest and post harvest storage was estimated at 6.76%. It was 8.45% in the case of small farmers, 7.33% in medium farms and 6.38% in large farms. In country like India, where about 26% of the population lives below poverty line, these food grown losses comes under a criminal wastage. There is no doubt that these losses cannot be brought at the zero level but can be significantly reduced through better management and infrastructure.

12

A new species of cestode parasites Stilesia shindei, from Mammalian animal Ovis bharal.

A. D. Lakhe

Pages:

59-61

2018

June

Stilesia shindei, Ovis bharal, Mammals.

The Stilesia shindei is a mammalian cestode collected from the intestine of a sheep, Ovis bharal at Parli- Vaijnath, dist. Beed. The worm is having a scolex large in size, quadrangular in shape; suckers four, large and oval. The mature segments thin, small, squarish; testes medium, oval; cirrus thin; vas deferens short and thin; ovary medium and oval; uterus cylindrical; vagina thin; ootype large oval and genital pores are small in size & oval in shape.

13

Effect of neem excel on the biology of Papilio demoleus L. Lepidoptera : Papilionoidae.

Sunita Arya

Pages:

63-65

2018

June

Neem excel, Biology, Papilio demoleus.

Papilio demoleus is a common and wide spread swallow tail butterfly which is also known as lime butterfly. The butterfly is a pest and invasive species found from Asia to Australia. The caterpillars can completely defoliate young Citrus trees and also delicate citrus nurseries. Azadirachtin, the active ingredient of neem has been demonstrated to have an antecedent and insect growth regulatory effects, negative influence on the reproduction of female as well as reduction in oviposition and infertility of eggs. Neem excel 0.15% EC was tested on citrus leaves and treated on 4th and 5th instars of caterpillar of P.demoleus. Mortality was found highly significant at 0.1% level of significance. However other concentrations also revealed significant mortality percentage at 5% level of significance. Adult emergence was considerably affected by 0.04% concentration, which caused 64.44% emergence in comparison to 95.00% in control. Pre ovipostion and oviposion periods were significantly delayed while post oviposition period was shortened to 93.33 hrs at 0.04% concentrations. Fertility was found reduced and after hatching percentage of malformed individuals were increased.

14

Biochemical studies of cestode Valipora parasite of Columba livia from Beed district.

A. M. Budrukkar and P. V. Patil

Pages:

67-68

2018

June

Valipora, Cestode parasite, Columba livia.

This paper contains biochemical study of cestode genus Valipora (Linton,1927) of Columba livia to understand their host parasite relationship. The protein contents in cestodes were estimated by the method given by Gornell et al. (1994) and lipid content were estimated by the Barner`s and Blackstock method (1973).

15

Nutritional effect of some food supplements (mixture of Spirulina and Yeast) on rearing performance of Eri silkworm in respect of some cocoon parameters.

Ulka Yadav and Ashok Bagdi

Pages:

69-71

2018

June

Eri silkworm, Spirulina, Nutritional supplement, Cocoon parameter.

For this study we have conducted the experiments to find out the effect of mixture of Spirulina and Yeast on the rearing performance of Eri-silkworm Philosamia ricini in respect of cocoon weight and shell weight of cocoon parameters. We have grouped the worms along with their control and then the experimental groups were treated with the different concentration and dosages of mixture of Spirulina and Yeast specially to find out the effect on the cocoons parameter (Cocoon weight, Shell weight). Then the collected data's were subjected to statistical analysis. All the results were found to be significant. It was found that average Cocoon weight (3.80 gm) was highest under treatment of 300 ppm concentrations with thrice a day doses and average Shell weight (0.63 gm) was highest under treatment of 300 ppm concentrations with thrice a day doses.

16

Importance of river islands for colonial ground nesting water birds - A case study of Ujani dam backwater of Bhima river, State Maharashtra.

K. M. Fartade, A. L. Deshmukh and S. S. Narwade

Pages:

73-76

2018

June

Island, Ujani dam, Bhima river, Deccan, Nests, River Tern.

River islands are the important habitat for ground nesting colonial birds. Many colonial nesting water birds such as terns, pratincoles and stilts are known to breed on islands in backwaters of Ujani dam of Bhima river. We surveyed 45 km length and 100 sq/km stretch of Bhima river backwater and selected six islands for three years of monitoring from year 2014-2016. A total of six bird species, including River Tern Sterna aurantia, Little Tern Sterna albiforns, Small Pratincole Glareola lactea, Oriental Pratincole Glareola maldivarum, Black-winged Stilt Himantopus himantopus and Red-wattled Lapwing Vanellus indicus were recorded nesting on the islands. We observed these islands get exposed in late winter season and usually get encroached by humans for various purposes such as agriculture, tourism and fishing resulting into loss of vital nesting opportunities for the birds.

17

Residual mercury in solid waste, contaminated fishes collected from Rushikulya estuary and impact of solid waste extract on a fresh water fish under laboratory conditions.

Tapas Kumar Priyadarsan and A. K. Panigrahi

Pages:

77-83

2018

June

Chlor-alkali industry, Solid waste, SWE, Mercury, Ventilation rate, Whole body oxygen uptake.

The collected solid waste from the dumped site was air dried and powdered. The powder was grayish white with 37% water holding capacity, with a specific gravity of 2.6% and 24% air content. The solid waste contained 106�16.5 mg of Hg Kg-1 dry weight. Significant decreases in all parameters were observed in the solid waste, might be due regular washing of the solid waste deposits by monsoon rain. The SWE prepared from this powder showed the features shown on Table.1. The solid waste extract contained 9.75 mg of Hg l-1. The exposed fishes appeared lethargic and loss of equilibrium and irregular swimming was observed when compared to control fish. The ventilation rate and whole body oxygen uptake significantly depleted in SWE exposed fishes in the exposure period when compared to control fish. It was observed that when fishes were exposed to toxicant, SWE for a lower period, chances of recovery was noted. Prolonged exposure to SWE lead to death and no recovery was noted even when best environmental conditions were made available.

18

Studies on sexual cannibalism with special reference to spiders.

Mohammad Salim, Mohammad Shahid Masroor and Shagufta Parween

Pages:

85-88

2018

June

Sexual cannibalism, Male death, Spiders, Mantises.

Sexual cannibalism is a phenomenon in which a male is eaten by the female prior, during or after the copulation. While this phenomenon is very common in spiders and mantises, it occurs in other invertebrates also. Further, this behaviour is believed to have evolved as a manifestation of sexual conflict occurring when the reproductive interests of males and females differ. Though, several theories have been put forward to explain the phenomenon of sexual cannibalism the present review is an attempt to explain it in the light of recent researches available so far.

19

Impact of leached chemicals of red mud waste on respiration rate of a fresh water fish, Oreochromis mossambicus, Peters and its ecological implications.

Manasi Kumari Panda, P. K. Dixit and A. K. Panigrahi

Pages:

89-93

2018

June

Alumna industry, RM waste, Leached chemicals, Effluent waste, Fish, Respiration rate.

This study was designed to study the impact of the leached waste (effluent) from the red mud pond of Alumina industry (NALCO) situated at Damonjodi, Koraput on the respiration rate of a fresh water fish, Oreochromis mossambicus, Peters (Tilapia) and its ecological significance. Fishes were exposed to graded series of concentrations of the waste extract for acute toxicity studies. The MAC value deduced was 3.45% of effluent in 50 liters of water for 30th days. A safety concentration of 3.4% of effluent l-50 was selected for this study. Exposed fishes were appeared lethargic after 7th days of exposure, when compared to the control fish. The whole body respiration rate decreased significantly after 7th days of exposure onwards. The respiration rate declined with the increase in exposure period up to 28th days of exposure. The exposed fishes were allowed to recover in toxicant free water for 7th days for 7d exposed fish, 14th days for 14d exposed fish, 21st days for 21d exposed fish and 28th days for 28d exposed fish. Significant recover was noted in 7d exposed fish where as with the increase in exposure period, the recovery was not significant. After 28th days of exposure, the fish could survive up to 24th days and afterwards the exposed fishes died during recovery due to drastic depletion in oxygen uptake by the fish from the recovery medium. The exposed fish could not recover to its pre-test activity even after 56th days of recovery, double the exposure period indicating damage to vital systems. Control fish remained clinically healthy for the entire period of experimentation.

20

Ichthyofauna of Mahasangvi reservoir Tq. Patoda dist. Beed (M.S.).

P. V. Patil and A. M. Budrukkar

Pages:

95-96

2018

June

Ichyofaunal diversity, Mahasangvi reservoir.

The Mahasangvi reservoir is located at village Mahasangvi. The Mahasangvi is about 10 km far from taluka Patoda . The reservoir is constructed on the river Manjra and the river later joins the river Godavari. The reservoir Mahasangvi was constructed in the year 1966 for irrigation purposes. The total population of the village Mahasangvi is 1900 and the distance between the reservoir and village is 0.3 km. The surrounding land used for khariph and rabbi crops regularly. In the khariph season the cotton mostly grown by the farmers and Jawar, Sugarcane, Ground nut etc are also grown by them. The reservoir water is used for irrigation, drinking, human activities and fishery activity. The water spread area of the reservoir Mahasangvi is 79.97 sq/km.

21

Zooplankton analysis for fish cultural aspect of Vanjarwadi dam dist. Beed (M.S.).

Prashant V. Patil

Pages:

97-98

2018

June

Zooplankton, Vanjarwadi.

Vanjarwadi is an minor irrigation reservoir located at Beed 10 km on Beed-Nagar highway. The area is described as hilly and dry as having less rain fall. In the present investigation the zooplankton analysis was carried for the last one year2016-2017. The details of study and analysis is described in the text.

22

King cobra reported from Gullar nallah (Marmat) of district Doda (J&K).

Ajaz A. Wani, Simriti Agarwal and Imtiyaz Ahmed

Pages:

99-100

2018

June

Reptiles are cold-blooded tetrapod vertebrates that either have four limbs or are limbless. Most reptiles are oviparous with few exceptions. The body is covered with scales or bony plates and a bony skeleton with a single occipital condyl, a distinct quadrate bone usually immovable articulate with the skull and ribs attached to the sternum. Among reptiles snakes belong to order Squmata. These are elongated legless carnivorous ectothermic amniote vertebrates covered by overlapping scales. The present paper deals with the report of king cobra from Gullar Nallah of Marmat dist. Doda of J&K state which is approximately 32 km from dist. headquarter Doda. This snake is new report from J&K state.

23

Impact of paper mill effluent on respiration rate of a fresh water fish, Oreochromis mossambicus, Peters and its ecological implications.

A. Padmavati, P. K. Dixit and A. K. Panigrahi

Pages:

101-106

2018

June

Alumna industry, RM waste, Leached chemicals, Effluent waste, Fish, Respiration rate.

This study was planned to study the impact of effluent discharged from International Paper Industry (located at Rajmundry (A.P.) on the bank of river Godavari) on the respiration rate of a fresh water fish, Oreochromis mossambicus, Peters (Tilapia) and its ecological significance. Fishes were exposed to graded series of concentrations of the effluent for acute toxicity studies. The MAC value deduced was 3.15% of effluent in 50 liters of water for 30th days. A safety concentration of 3.1% of effluent l-50 was selected for this study. Exposed fishes appeared lethargic after 7th days of exposure, when compared to the control fish. The whole body respiration rate decreased significantly after 7days of exposure onwards. The respiration rate declined with the increase in exposure period up to 28th days of exposure. The exposed fishes were allowed to recover in toxicant free water for 7th days for 7d exposed fish, 14th days for 14d exposed fish, 21th days for 21d exposed fish and 28th days for 28d exposed fish. Significant recover was noted in 7d exposed fish where as with the increase in exposure period, the recovery was not significant. After 28th days of exposure, the fish could survive up to 24th days and afterwards the exposed fishes died during recovery due to drastic depletion in oxygen uptake by the fish from the recovery medium. The exposed fish could not recover to its pre-test activity even after 56th days of recovery, double the exposure period indicating damage to vital systems. Control fish remained clinically healthy for the entire period of experimentation.

24

Dietary habits, a major determining role in early onset of post menopausal osteoporosis.

Meenakshi Mayanger Marmath

Pages:

107-109

2018

June

Estrogen, Osteoporosis, Diet, Osteoclast.

More the development of society and nation more will be geriatric population. More the geriatric population more will be geriatric health problems - the most important and the most universal diseases is Osteoporosis Bone density in females is related to the hormonal status. Incidence of osteoporosis is more in post-menopausal women due to lack of the hormone estrogen, as lack of estrogen in the body increases the activity of osteoclasts. Since everybody, especially females after a certain age start losing bone and developing osteoporosis; proper balanced diet is very essential for the development of bones. A balanced diet including sufficient amount of proteins, minerals and vitamins should be taken and it is immaterial whether the diet is vegetarian or non-vegetarian. This can prevent osteoporosis from its early onset.

25

Perception and awareness about vector borne diseases namely malaria and dengue in Kota.

Meenakshi Mayanger Marmath

Pages:

110-110

2018

June

Vector borne diseases, Mosquito, Malaria, Perception, Awareness.

As a result of global warming there is a rise in vector borne diseases worldwide. The present study is an endeavor to assess the perception in public about mosquito as a vector of malaria and dengue and awareness about the spread and control of these diseases.

26

Seasonal fluctuations in some physico-chemical characteristics of Vanjarwadi dam dist. Beed (M.S.).

Prashant V. Patil

Pages:

111-113

2018

June

Vanjarwadi, Fluctuations, Beed.

Vanjarwadi Dam is constructed in 1965 for irrigation purpose. It is located near Beed on Beed- Ahmadnagar highway about 11 km away from Beed district. Now a days this dam is also used for fish cultural activities. The hydrobiological data on this dam is meager hence the study was carried for the period of one year from June,2015-May,2016. The study shows that all parameters investigated are within the standard limits presented by Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS).

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